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2nd August 2016

2016 edition of the Clinical Social Franchising Compendium

The 2016 edition of the annual Clinical Social Franchising Compendium is now available! This report offers a snapshot of the geographies served, services offered, scale, and impact of clinical social franchises in low- and middle-income countries

2016 edition of the Clinical Social Franchising Compendium

 

70 social franchises located in 40 countries report on their program and performance data in this publication. Several of these franchises have been operational for over a decade, and the Compendium offers a window into their current status. Social franchises have demonstrated a laudable commitment to transparency in reporting, and this commitment can support a genuine analysis of this intervention as a means to changing the marketplace for health (or the face of public sector service delivery. You’ll note that at least seven programs report that their networks primarily include public sector providers).

When many of these social franchises were first designed, they were intended to promote access to under-provided health services. Some have done so remarkably well, as you will observe in the section of the report devoted to "additionality" (defined as the increase in mCPR (Contraceptive Prevalence Rate, modern methods) attributable to social franchises.)

Many were also designed to serve the poorest populations. Some franchises are beginning to report on this outcome (as you will see in the profiles of 15 programs), and results are mixed. These data are inspiring programs to re-think who they franchise, as you will learn in Matt Boxshall’s commentary on why equity measurement is important. (Matt is Director of the African Health Markets for Equity partnership).

Social franchising is one important means to creating greater public health value through the current private healthcare workforce. The Compendium, now in its seventh year of production, can be a highly useful analytical resource for anyone interested in healthcare marketplace interventions. Download a copy at http://bit.ly/2aJJlzm.

Learn more about social franchises by visiting www.sf4health.org